Our Electric Citizen

CEA, CityBeat, Electric Citizen

Laura showing off her mad style, and CEA award.

Congratulations to our very own brand leader rockstar, and now official rockstar Laura Dolan. Her band Electric Citizen won Best Rock Band at this past Sunday’s Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, put on by CityBeat.

Laura may spend 60+ hours a week working for CD and our clients, but when the rest of us cozy up on the couch for a Netflix marathon, Laura provides vocals, songwriting, and well, a zeppelin of style to her band Electric Citizen. Their next show is Saturday February 8th at Northside’s Comet bar. Catch them before it goes to her head and they move to LA. Kidding, but really. They released a stream of a song from their new album after the win and it sounds so good you’d think they’ve been snorting ants poolside.

 

About Christina Pfeffer

Christina attended the University of Cincinnati where she majored in Communications (with a focus in Mass Media and Rhetoric) and minored in Fine Arts and Art History. She worked at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Institutional Advancement where she managed volunteers and fundraisers, until jumping ship to advertising.

Vine Died

Instagram Video, Vine, Dead Vine

Someone forgot to water the plants.

Today Instagram released version 4.0, including the ability to load videos. And someone (everyone) at Vine cried (probably?). I actually just started using Vine recently more and more. Mostly because of the fun of video on Snapchat.

However, now that Instagram has the option I don’t really need Vine anymore. And I’m not alone.

Mashable already released 6 reasons why Instagram is better than Vine for videos:

  1. Clip editing
  2. Cover frame
  3. Filters (duh)
  4. Tap to focus
  5. Image stabilization
  6. Vision beyond the video frame

And Twitter. Well, they bit the hand that feeds them, basically:twitter, tweeter

What do you think? Will Vine beat the competition? Where will you film your next video? Snapchat me.

About Christina Pfeffer

Christina attended the University of Cincinnati where she majored in Communications (with a focus in Mass Media and Rhetoric) and minored in Fine Arts and Art History. She worked at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Institutional Advancement where she managed volunteers and fundraisers, until jumping ship to advertising.

Everyone Has an Something to Say About Google Glass

google glass, new technology

Don’t Understand. On so many levels.

By now you had to have seen or read something about Google’s newest gift to society, Google Glass. The new eyewear that serves as your new smartphone and laptop and camera all in one.  And, as with most new technologies, people are terrified. The concern is privacy; which is as old as the initial portable camera. This NY Times piece talks about the concerns that people had with cellphone cameras, and still apparently have with the prospect of Google Glass. Which is kind of hard to accept – that people still think that where people just naturally go; the uncivilized way with our new toys.

AdWeek Mentions:“To be fair to Google, there’s never been a high-tech gadget like Google Glass and certainly not any social mores to go along with it.”

Mores build on experience, they aren’t something we’re born with. We all learned how to use cameras and what is acceptable – although with Instagram and Snapchat that’s certainly still evolving. Was food always this documented? Probably not.

Even more so people already think that people who wear (or will wear rather) are jerks. And even Google’s developers aren’t super excited to wear them all the time, or even some of the time.

This video does a great job describing how creepy things can get.

It seems like a good way to completely loose grasp on reality to me. Whatever that is now. We are already so wrapped up in our phones – when we’re not in front of computer screens – this would take away (potentially) the precious time we have without technology involved. I’m not a neo-luddite or anything, I just think we’re moving way beyond necessity.

 social study, cellphones

Lastly, they look ridiculous. I’m waiting for some sort of re-design more along the lines of existing eyewear shapes (they actually might have something in the works with Warby Parker). But still, aside from that I’m just not that interested in them. In fact, I’m trying to interact less with technology and more face-to-face (sans creepy future eyewear).

Did you pre-order? Do you think it’s okay places have already banned them? What would you like to see people do with them ultimately?

About Christina Pfeffer

Christina attended the University of Cincinnati where she majored in Communications (with a focus in Mass Media and Rhetoric) and minored in Fine Arts and Art History. She worked at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Institutional Advancement where she managed volunteers and fundraisers, until jumping ship to advertising.

Mascot Madness: Round Two – Wichita V Gonzaga

March Madness, Mascots, Basketball

Gonzaga Bulldogs VS Wichita State Shockers

It was a close call for the Gonzaga Bulldogs with a possible Cinderella coming from Southern U Thursday evening, but the number one seed pulled through.The Wichita Shockers were a slight upset in stats, but not in play, to Pittsburg earlier in the same day as the Gonzaga game. As a result of their victories, they will play each other in the next round, but today I’m going to put their mascots and logos head to head.

Wichita State University’s mascot is WuShock, or just Wu. And despite Wu looking like the “big, bad, muscle bound bundle of wheat” he is – he’s actually over 60 years old. His name was determined by a winning vote after a Freshman suggested it in 1948. But the premise goes back to 1904. This is farm town and players back in the day would actually harvest – or “shock” wheat – on the off season. Coach Kirk came up with Wheatshockers to intimidate the Chilocco Indians for their upcoming game.

wichita shockers, old school

Not so scary back then. Wait is that the scarecrow from the wizard of Oz?

Now upon first viewing of this golden jock I thought it was pretty lame. Wheat? However, I have to say after looking at different pictures of this guy I’ve developed a soft spot for this farm boy. I mean look at him here in the fall with a pumpkin. Adorbs.

The  Gonzaga Bulldogs were originally “The Fighting Irish,” and thankfully changed before Notre Dame inevitably would have battled that out with them. A reporter is the legendary person responsible for the switch, saying the players were fighting like bulldogs. So it literally started with a Bulldog named Spike, a literal living dog – not the same one I’m sure (sad face) – as a mascot until 1980.

gonzaga bulldog

It switched after 1980 to Captain “Zag” all due to a student putting on a cape and declaring himself the name. Somehow that stuck for five years (seriously) until another student dressed up like a dog in ‘85.

The Bulldogs – or Zags as they’re commonly called – are one of the top teams this year. The Bulldogs have a winning record. The logo suggests a pretty mean puppy. But is also a bulldog, and well who doesn’t think of this guy from Looney Tunes?

Gonzaga Bulldogs, Looney Tunes

Big tough guys always have a soft spot for adorable things.

So decision time – Bulldogs V Shockers. Colorwise Bulldogs win. Navy blue, white, red have more authority than, the Shockers yellow and black. Both logos have a pretty mean mug and are leaning in for the fight so – I get it, they’re angry. However, Wu looks like the days if harvesting have given him wrinkles and well a bulldog is still a dog. Wichita State really has developed a brand with Wu and are pretty dedicated to him; that has to mean something – I mean students can’t just dress up as something else here and the college is like “okay,” like some other guys.

With my new found love (just throwing that word around now) for Wu I didn’t think the Bulldogs stood a chance. Nothing beat small town charm right? Wrong. Puppies win all. Gonzaga wins.

Spike, Gonzaga, March Madness

Would really say he isn’t a winner?

 

What do you think? Did Wichita mess up your perfect bracket too? Do you love the long blonde hair of Gonzaga forward Kelly Olynyk?

 

About Christina Pfeffer

Christina attended the University of Cincinnati where she majored in Communications (with a focus in Mass Media and Rhetoric) and minored in Fine Arts and Art History. She worked at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Institutional Advancement where she managed volunteers and fundraisers, until jumping ship to advertising.

OFFF Cincinnati was ONNN

OFFF, Cincinnati, Design, Art

I attended the OFFF Cincinnati conference last Wednesday and it delivered. It’s main message? Play. That’s also the focus of the coordinating exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Center which opened on Friday with a big party, and many contributors in attendance.
The conference started early with coffee and then went right into introductions. Hector Ayuso came out – the organizer of it all, along with AIGA Cincinnati – and explained his excitement and introduced the first speaker.

Here they are:

Ramon Escola

Escola was hilarious in his humble delivery and young-hearted enthusiasm for what he does. And he does it well. He integrates photography and video with animation and digital work that not only communicates well, but is hilarious. He brought in another theme throughout the conference – collaboration – encouraging all those in attendance to work with as many people as possible to expand their work.

Jon Burgerman

My favorite presenter of the day. Burgerman is an artist, but he should also just add comedian/entertainer to the CV. His presentation was a slideshow of not just his work, but random video and images that contributed to what could have been seen as an extemporaneous discussion (but considering the preparation, it was not). Certainly a crowd pleaser, switching between pizza drawings and kittens in cleavage Burgerman got the play theme across pretty well.

Brendan Dawes

Switching paces to the bit more serious, Dawes was the next to speak. His work focuses a lot on visualizing data, and using technology and electronics to generate actually quite emotional pieces. One of my favorites (I think I might buy one even) was his Lissajous Iteration print. Using code and only change one part from image to image he generated the series pictured below.

Brendan Dawes

He stressed how this relates to the practice of just continuing to work. By only changing one single element of code between them sometimes results were drastically different than the multiples preceding it; similar to the idea that you have no idea where you can end up if you keep producing work.  Further he said one line that has resonated with me probably the most from the whole day.  “What if the next one could make you cry?” We’ll never know, but you have to stop at some point – often due to time or client budget – but you can’t keep going forever you have to know when to go on to the next.

James Paterson;

Paterson is an artist, animator, and programmer of Montreal. He talked about his three types of drawing (meditative, imaginary, and charts/graphs), and his virtual animations. He was fascinating for his extreme devotion (certainly all presenters had this quality to some degree) but he almost seemed to get caught up in thinking about the work while he was explaining it, ever the improver.

We took a break for lunch (where OMG I saw Jon Burgerman outside!) and then started off the afternoon with more coffee and the first (and only) female presenter.

Sara Blake

An intense illustrator with sleeves of tattoos and a soft voice Blake discussed and showed multiple videos of her laborious process of illustrating and adding colors/textures with Photoshop. She too pushed the idea of collaborating to reach new levels of your work you couldn’t on your own. Interesting too she shared that her first internship in NYC was in the fashion industry, despite her lack of interest (it was a family contact just to get her in NYC) in the field; but how she now has a textile company. She remarked on this as an example of how you don’t know where you’re heading, or what could happen – a thought that I always appreciate others to grasp.

Multitouch Barcelona

The Spanish design studio Multitouch Barcelona deal mostly with how people interact with technology and then each other.  Doing large scale installation of an interactive Space Invaders, or the current project Gif Me, Multitouch Barcelona wants the end result to be people having lasting interactions with the art, make new friends, and to think about how technology can be a resource in these interactions.
Technology proved to be quite the conference saver when the next presenter could not attend and we used Skype to still see his presentation.

Onur Senturk

The designer/animator most well known for doing the opening titles for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, presented from what seemed to be his living room with a cup of tea and his cat. Senturk let the video speak for themselves for the most part. Below is the opening titles he did for the OFFF Cincinnati conference.

OFFF 2013 Cincinnati Opening Titles from Onur Senturk on Vimeo.

James Victore

The guy with all the really huge clients (Moet & Chandon, Esquire, TIME, etc.) Vitore talked about the importance of working for yourself, and to stop feeling like a victim of the economy or of your job. To just do what you want. His work is great and the work he presented was incredibly executed (see below a poster for the New York Probation Department); however I found him to be preachy with his ideals.

James Victore

 

I do have to admit though it could have been the copious amounts of coffee wearing off and the hunger starting to creep in after the long day.
In the end I was thoroughly impressed, inspired, and enlightened by the presenters and look forward to next year – the conference, and the work I come up with until then using play, and collaboration.

 

About Christina Pfeffer

Christina attended the University of Cincinnati where she majored in Communications (with a focus in Mass Media and Rhetoric) and minored in Fine Arts and Art History. She worked at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Institutional Advancement where she managed volunteers and fundraisers, until jumping ship to advertising.